June

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Why You Should Consider Domestic Travel Insurance

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With the summer season now in full swing and many children on vacation, more and more individuals and families will be traveling to take advantage of the warmer temperatures, both abroad and domestically. “Staycationing” or domestic travel is also becoming a popular alternative to international travel, but many people who choose to staycation often forget that forgoing travel insurance even during a staycation can jeopardize their enjoyment and travel experience.

Even if your travel plans include an extended getaway not far from home, it still carries the same risks as if you were to travel to a foreign country. What if you have an emergency due to unforeseen circumstances? If you don’t have the coverage necessary to address your staycation emergency it could potentially result in having to spend money on a costly situation such as a hospital visit.

Wherever you choose to spend your summer holiday, be it in one of the Caribbean islands or exploring the sights and sounds of New York City, having travel insurance for your trip can be the difference in losing hundreds or thousands of dollars in non-refundable expenses if your trip had to be cancelled and perhaps most importantly, it will give you a greater sense of security and peace of mind.

For more information on our Domestic Travel Insurance and Trip Protection please visit the following page: https://www.trawickinternational.com/travel-insurance-plans/domestic-travel-insurance-trip-protection.

This update is provided by travel insurance provider Trawick International. Some of our travel insurance plans include international and domestic inbound and outbound travel insurance, missionary travel insurance, trip protection and cancellation, visitor insurance, and Schengen Visa. Call 877-233-4591 for more information.

By Administrator at 29 Jun 2016

The Zika Virus and Your Travel Plans

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When it comes to travel, a significant portion of it involves perception. A perception of fear can deter anyone from travel, just consider the fears from the past associated with SARS, the Ebola virus, or avian flu. Hundreds of thousands of people canceled their plans because of these viruses and the same seems to be happening again with the Zika virus.

The Zika virus should not deter you from traveling somewhere. Although it is imperative that you do your homework and talk with your physician about where you’re going and the risks involved, it’s also a matter of using some common sense. If you’re traveling somewhere like Brazil, for example, it’s best to stay away from their jungles and make sure you’ve got insect repellant with DEET of at least fifty percent or for a natural repellent, try Lemon Eucalyptus Oil.

As a precautionary measure, you’ll also want to make sure that the Zika virus is one of the conditions covered if you intend on purchasing travel insurance. Despite the fact that the World Health Organization has deemed the Zika virus a public health emergency, a number of travel insurance providers do not currently cover the condition. Future travelers should know however, that the travel medical plans provided by Trawick International do in fact include the Zika virus.

This update is provided by travel insurance provider Trawick International. Some of our travel insurance plans include international and domestic inbound and outbound travel insurance, missionary travel insurance, trip protection and cancellation, visitor insurance, and Schengen Visa. Call 877-233-4591 for more information.

By Administrator at 23 Jun 2016

Traveling Internationally with Your Child

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A domestic flight with your child is one thing, but it can be significantly tougher if you’re planning on traveling abroad. It’s important to have the proper documentation for your child beyond the passport available, especially if only one parent is traveling. 

The rules for children traveling internationally have become significantly more stringent around the world as a means of reducing kidnappings, illegal trafficking and disputes involving child custody. To prevent any issues, consider bringing along a copy of the child’s birth certificate. It may also be worth having a notarized note from the other parent clearly stating that the child is allowed to travel internationally. Unless the child is being accompanied by both parents, any child under the age of 18 must have a notarized permission note from both parents or proof of guardianship if the child is traveling with someone besides the parent.

If your child does not have a United States passport and is under the age of 14, proof of consent from both parents or the guardian must also be included in the passport application. Both parents should be physically present upon submitting the passport application but there is also the option of providing a notarized statement of permission should a parent be absent.

If you have international travel plans, you may also want to familiarize yourself with the Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program. The program immediately alerts the parents of an abducted child if another application for a passport is initiated anywhere in the world.

This update is provided by travel insurance provider Trawick International. Some of our travel insurance plans include international and domestic inbound and outbound travel insurance, missionary travel insurance, trip protection and cancellation, visitor insurance, and Schengen Visa. Call 877-233-4591 for more information.

By Administrator at 22 Jun 2016

Traveling with a Special Needs Child

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Traveling with your children already requires some degree of pre-planning to ensure as smooth and worry-free trip as possible, and this is even more important if you are the parent of a special needs child.

Prior to booking your flight, you may wish to find a book that you and your child can read together about airplane travel. This step can help your child understand what to expect once the departure day arrives and it can also help them cope if they are sensitive to crowded spaces or sudden changes.

As a complement to the book, check to see whether your local airport offers rehearsal flights so that your child can become acclimated with the process of going through the security checkpoints, having someone physically grab their bag, and sitting on a plane while under the restraint of a seatbelt. This process can also help you determine what seating arrangement(s) work best for your child.

If you have a long flight, you may wish to consider breaking it up and booking a stopover flight so both you and your child can rest and take a breather. Take into account what time your child is most relaxed when booking the flight and ensure that your seats remain together.

Always keep a list of the medications and your child’s healthcare provider information readily available when traveling in case of an unforeseen emergency. You may also want to consider having a medical necklace or bracelet made.

Finally, before traveling check the TSA website regarding information on special needs children. You may find useful information that will make the travel process easier.

This update is provided by travel insurance provider Trawick International. Some of our travel insurance plans include international and domestic inbound and outbound travel insurance, missionary travel insurance, trip protection and cancellation, visitor insurance, and Schengen Visa. Call 877-233-4591 for more information.

By Administrator at 21 Jun 2016

Travel Warnings and Alerts

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In today’s climate, it’s not unheard of for the government to issue travel warnings and alerts. Depending on where you’re traveling to and what you’ll be doing, it’s important to understand how these two differ as they could affect your trip.

A travel alert is also known as a travel public announcement and is typically short in nature. These alerts are issued due to factors like events that are related to terrorism, the anniversary of a specific terrorist event, and political unrest. These alerts are usually accompanied by information regarding potential threats and short-term conditions that the government believes may affect American travelers and pose significant risks to their security. Travel alerts were recently issued due to the hurricane and typhoon seasons in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico.

A travel warning is considered more severe than a travel alert and means that the State Department is suggesting Americans entirely avoid traveling to a particular country because of instability or when a U.S. embassy or consulate is closed, therefore reducing the U.S. Government’s ability to assist American citizens. The U.S. Department of State issued travel warnings back in March urging citizens to avoid travel to southeastern Turkey due to terrorism threats. It’s important to note that warnings do not mean you cannot travel to the country in question, they are simply meant as a safety or precautionary measure.

This update is provided by travel insurance provider Trawick International. Some of our travel insurance plans include international and domestic inbound and outbound travel insurance, missionary travel insurance, trip protection and cancellation, visitor insurance, and Schengen Visa. Call 877-233-4591 for more information.

By Administrator at 16 Jun 2016
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